Recommended Leadership Books

Recommended Leadership Books from CollegeMotivation.com

Bennis, W.G. (1989). On becoming a leader. Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing.

Bennis, W. & Nanus, B. (1995) Leaders: The Strategies of Taking Charge. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers.

Bolman, L., & Deal, T. (2001). Leading with soul. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Burns, J.M. (1978). Leadership. New York: Harper & Row.

Covey, S.R. (1991). Principle-centered leadership. New York: Summit Books.

DePree, M. (1989). Leadership is an art. New York: Doubleday.

DePree, M. (1992). Leadership jazz. New York: Dell Publishing.

Drath, W. (2001). The deep blue sea: Rethinking the source of leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Gardner, J. (1990). On leadership. New York: The Free Press.

Goleman, D., Boyatzis, R., & McKee, A. (2002). Primal leadership. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Greenleaf, R. (1977). Servant leadership. New York: Paulist Press.

Greenleaf, R. (1996). On becoming a servant leader. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Heifetz, R.A. (1994). Leadership without easy answers. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press.

Higher Education Research Institute. (1996). A social change model of leadership development: Guidebook version III. College Park, MD: National Clearinghouse For Leadership Programs.

Hughes, R.L., Ginnett, R.C., & Curphy, R.C. (2001). Leadership: Enhancing the lessons of experience (4th ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Komives, S.R., Lucas, N., & McMahon, T.R. (1998). Exploring leadership: For college students who want to make a difference. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Kotter, J. (1996). Leading change. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Kouzes, J. & Posner, B. (2002). The leadership challenge (3rd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Matusak, L.R. (1996). Finding your voice: Learning to lead…anywhere you want to make a difference. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Northouse, P.G. (2001). Leadership: Theory and practice (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Rost, J. (1991). Leadership for the twenty-first century. New York: Praeger.

Senge, P.M. (1990). The fifth discipline: the art and practice of the learning organization. New York: Doubleday.

Wren, J.T. (1995). The leader’s companion: Insights on leadership through the ages. New York: The Free Press.

High School Leadership Development Retreats: High impact student leadership development experience at the right time

I spent two weekends in June helping with a couple of leadership retreat type conferences for high school students. I was the closing speaker for both the HOBY (Hugh O’Brien Youth Program) conference in Madison, Wisconsin as well as WILS, the Wisconsin Leadership Seminar, which is held in Milwaukee. I made it through the Wisconsin flooding to be with amazing groups of high school students each weekend. I’ve been helping with conference such as these for a handful of years and they are always very powerful experiences for the students, if not the most powerful experience they have had in their life up to that point. They leave visibly changed. Here are some key elements that may make the experience so powerful for the students.

Firsts.
For many students it could be their first leadership learning experience. It could be their first retreat. It could be their first time in residence at a college. It could be their first formal experience to learn about themselves. Our first experiences are often times our most impacting.

Early Start.
It looks like leadership development can be provided to students younger and younger. The students at these conferences just finished their sophomore year of high school. It seems like the time is ripe for them to start discovering themselves and their leadership. After all, they will be applying to college soon and a conference or experience like this could help them with that process and thinking about their future. Perhaps students can even start younger with leadership retreats such as these.

New Peers.
The students arrive as the only student from their high school. They meet other students from similar situations…being their school’s ambassador. It can be powerful to leave your normal peer group to be amongst new peers, especially peers interested in and willing to engage in a leadership conference.

Experience Leadership.
It is experiential. Students do service projects, group projects, and other kinds of projects. They are learning about leadership and themselves through doing it with new people. Though there are a lot of panels where the students sit back and listen to people practicing leadership, the experiences they practice for themselves may be key for them. The students also are very willing to experience. They will be eager to do almost any new experience or activity you ask of them.

Small Groups.
Students are a part of a small group. Through this group they are able to see how new groups can form and lead together through actually experiencing it. For many of these students it is more engaging and easier to share with one another in this small group format.

Craziness.
Crazy might be a close relative of creativity or courage. Students are not only allowed but encouraged to get a little crazy. They use their creativity and energy in full force. The cheers resonate through the whole weekend of the conference. Students can try out new actions and display their talents. A major focus is on being yourself and coming out of your shell.

Key Questions.
At the stage of leadership development the students are at, I’m proposing that they should be encountering self discovery and the diversity of experiences that allow for that self discovery to occur. From reflection on the experiences they have had students can begin to look inward and answer some key questions. I believe that these are key questions for students to start thinking about:
What are my most meaningful experiences?
What are my strengths?
What are my interests?
What are my values?
What new experiences should I gain to learn more about myself?

I have heard over and over again from participants how much their experience with HOBY, WILS, or other first leadership retreats had meant to their life…even 10 years later. I wish I would have had the opportunity to participate in something like this as a high school student before preparing for college application. In conclusion, I believe that we can use many more of these weekend leadership retreats for high school students. The impact seems to be so high at the right time for the students. States, schools, and various programs could certainly offer similar experiences to impact students leadership development and get them on the right track for thinking about college and their future.

Authenticity as a Spiritual Framework for Educating a New Generation of Leaders: 2008 National Leadership Symposium

I am excited for the 2008 National Leadership Symposium! The theme is “Authenticity as a Spiritual Framework for Educating a New Generation of Leaders”
July 10-13, 2008
University of Richmond Richmond, VA

Here is the information about the Symposium and how to register while there are still spots available:
To register, please visit www.naca.org
You do not need to be an NACA member to register online.
Regular Registration Fees: $525

Now in its 18th year, the National Leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals and other education practitioners involved with promoting college student leadership education. The National Leadership Symposium is a joint program coordinated by the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) and the National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP). Given the intense learning environment of the Symposium (included required reading prior to attending), it is advised that participants have significant professional experience in leadership education. Registration is limited to 50 people. This year’ s symposium will explore the connection of spirituality to leadership and paves the way for scholars and practitioners to revisit the foundation of leadership based on authenticity. Our scholar authors will provide a theoretical framework for defining authenticity and value-based leadership with an emphasis on spirituality. Participants will engage in critical discussion and consider the intentional development of programs that can support students’ deeper meaning of leadership. As well, participants will consider the purposeful action colleges and universities can take to develop morally authentic habits in students, which can serve to influence communities and organizations toward a deeper commitment to social and civic responsibility.

Learning objectives of the 2008 symposium include:
Understanding the intersections between spirituality and leadership. Explore values and character development and their effects on leadership. Revisit one’s own leadership philosophy. Creation of a network of practitioners, educators and scholars that informs a more current understanding of the collective work in spirituality and leadership.

Program Chairs:
Karl Brooks Doctoral Candidate, Director of Leadership Institute DePaul University, Chicago, IL Dr. Lucy Croft Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL
National Leadership Symposium Scholars-in-Residence
Dr. Jon C. Dalton Associate Professor in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Dr. Sharon Daloz Parks Associate Director and Faculty Whidbey Institute, Clinton, WA Ms. Juana Bordas President, Mestiza Leadership International Denver, CO

Required Reading:
In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to have read the following books:
Encouraging Authenticity & Spirituality in Higher Education by Arthur Chickering, Jon C. Dalton, and Liesa Stamm Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith by Sharon Daloz Parks Leadership Can Be Taught: A Bold Approach for a Complex World by Sharon Daloz Parks Salsa, Soul, and Spirit: Leadership for a Multicultural Age by Juana Bordas

Leadership Program Innovation Online Brainstorm Findings

Valerie Johnson, a graduate student interested in leadership programs synthesized the results of an online brainstorm about leadership program innovation and wrote the following article. This brainstorm is ongoing and you can still add ideas and vote! Thanks for the article Valerie!

A recent brainstorm on brainreactions.net gathered ideas about providing quality and innovative leadership programs. The following questions were posed: “What is the high quality leadership program of the near future like? What practices, activities, features, etc. would be part of a great leadership program? What tips do you have for what works now that should be built upon? What are new ideas for things to include in the program? How can learning, development, and positive outcomes be accelerated?” From this discussion, the responses were coded based on commonalities. From these codes, some primary themes emerged including the selection of students for your leadership programs, how to reach students, the importance of encouraging change, and partnerships.

Selecting a Wide Range of Diverse Students
One suggestion was to select a number of students from a wide range of backgrounds could benefit your program. Because of this, you open the door for students to be exposed to wide range of backgrounds that they may have never encountered before. Helen Keller sums up this thought in her quote: “The highest result of education is tolerance.” Decide how you will select students into your program. Will you use an application, an interview or something different? Is it worth to you know each students leadership story before they enter the program?

Know Your Audience
Remembering who your audience may be essential to the success of your program. Some suggestions stated that many of the current students use current web applications like Facebook and Myspace. Is there a way for you to tie in these applications to recruit students and to assist in the projects completed in your program? Capitalizing on where the students spend time may open the opportunity for leadership to be practiced every day in the normal routines students already have.

Create opportunities for Change
Another highlight from this brainstorm was to encourage the potential for creating a change, as it relates to leadership. A suggestion was given of setting this up as a problem for students to solve while they explore leadership. By having students work to facilitate the process of solving an every day process they gain knowledge on the problem, learn about goal setting, and acquire new organizational skills. Through this process there is a natural opportunity for evaluation, which may be a starting discussion point for you and your student(s).

Partnerships for Mentoring, Advising, and Learning from Others Experience
A final thought to consider when constructing your leadership program is the possibility of collaborating with others to make your program stronger. Partnerships are not always easy and may take time, but once they are successfully establish the results may be numerous. Partnerships may include a student mentor who has already completed the program, a mentor from outside of the program, or guest speakers from across campus and the community. Utilize these partnerships to build relationships with your students and others on campus.

In conclusion, there is not one single quality that makes for a strong leadership program. The best method for an establishment of leadership programs is to assess what is going on your campus and to gather information from the students. When you take the time to for this assessment, you develop the information you need to start a successful program.

Author: Valerie Johnson

Sharing in an Organizational Culture of Innovation: Insights from Leadership Program Research Applied

In my consulting work, we hear from many organizations that they desire a positive culture of innovation within their organizations that relies on the collaboration, contribution, and shared leadership of all employees. At BrainReactions, we have created a program to achieve positive outcomes in this area. During the final three years I worked on my doctoral dissertation studying high quality leadership programs, I was also creating and testing an innovation program for BrainReactions. This was a leadership program designed to help participants learn and engage in ideation and innovation for real purposes.

Like many companies, we highly value creating and sustaining a positive culture of innovation in our organization. Achieving this requires an intentional approach to develop the people of your company as exemplary creators, innovators, and leaders. Our vision with our leadership training program at BrainReactions involved moving from brainstorm sessions to a front end of innovation leadership program. This moves from just generating the ideas to also including training and development of the people who innovate.

In addition to the research of high quality programs, which included interviews of 62 stakeholders across four different exemplary leadership programs, the researcher developed and tested a new innovation program and individual program sessions with BrainReactions brainstormers. During a three-year period of research and testing, approximately 100 sessions where conducted, assessed, and improved accordingly. Sessions were qualitative and consisted of 5-12 individuals per session. Sessions were recorded, transcribed, and assessed for participant engagement, idea quantity and quality. The researcher employed the constant comparative method, an analytic induction grounded theory data analysis technique, to explore the data and construct a theory.

The theory of high quality leadership programs developed in the dissertation study is grounded in those programmatic attributes that, when enacted, contribute significantly to enhancing learning and leadership development. The data analysis revealed 16 attributes of high quality leadership programs organized into three clusters: a) participants engaged in building and sustaining a learning community; b) student-centered experiential learning experiences; and c) research grounded continuous program development. Through the program attributes, participants learn about innovation, leadership and themselves in the course of engaging in the leadership process while reflecting on and applying their new learning and skills in collaborative action with others.

The results of this multi-case grounded theory study of high quality leadership programs could be applied and adapted to enhance leadership development and innovation in a wide range of organizations. This theory will allow organizations to enhance their programs and participants’ leadership development by helping participants improve themselves through self-discovery, personal development, reflective practice and collaborative leadership action with others. This leadership action and learning can be directed towards idea generating for innovation to meet changing needs and opportunities for the organization though helping individuals contribute to and share leadership in an organizational culture of innovation.

To be a high quality program involves anchoring the systems and program in research, both what has happened elsewhere and what you have discovered internally. Our high quality leadership program for innovation that has yielded numerous positive individual, organizational, and client outcomes involves three clusters of attributes for program development. Both the diverse and engaged participants cluster as well as systems learning for continuous program improvement cluster are leveraged for development in addition to the individual centered experiential brainstorming experience cluster.

In essence I recommend more organizations to implement a leadership program that allows all employees to contribute to a positive culture of innovation through participating in innovation together. Programs can be constructed and facilitating using the identified clusters of attributes that matter most for learning and development.
There is a report identifying attributes of high quality leadership programs and how BrainReactions put these attributes into practice for their own innovation program and programs they develop for clients. Email Darin Eich at darin.eich@brainreactions.com for more information or to receive the report.

Online Brainstorm about Leadership Programs of the Future

There is an online brainstorm live that anyone can contribute to. The purpose is to innovate leadership programs. Please visit www.brainreactions.net/brainstorms/1917 to contribute your ideas for what the high quality leadership program of the future could be like or feature. So far there are over 30 ideas on the brainstorm from 6 different individuals. This is a brainstorm so contribute many ideas without fear of judgment…they are just ideas at this stage and the meaning making will happen later. Hopefully we can develop some new ideas for folks to try who are creating new programs.

High Quality Leadership Program Dissertation Available

This Grounded Theory of High Quality Leadership Programs dissertation is now available for purchase for $29.


You can buy directly through the above paypal button and the 316 page dissertation pdf will be emailed to you. This pdf would be helpful to leadership learners, program developers, teachers, and researchers.

A Grounded Theory of High Quality Leadership Progams — Dissertation Abstract

I defended my dissertation on July 17th, 2007! A BIG thank you goes out to all of the leadership educators who contributed to this study in a number of meaningful ways. Here is the dissertation abstract.

A GROUNDED THEORY OF HIGH QUALITY LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS:
PERSPECTIVES FROM STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS IN HIGHER EDUCATION


Darin J. Eich


At the University of Wisconsin-Madison


       This study investigated four high-quality leadership programs to illuminate the “black box” of what contributes to learning in leadership development programs. Drawing on the experiences and perspectives of multiple stakeholders closely associated with diverse types of student leadership programs, the purpose of this study was to identify the attributes of leadership programs — including the specific actions associated with these attributes — that contribute significantly to undergraduate student leadership development. 
       For the purposes of this research, program sites were selected based upon their long-term record and reputation from other leadership educators for creating significantly positive student learning and development outcomes. Theoretical sampling was utilized as a strategy to conduct 62 one-on-one interviews with individuals (students, teachers, administrators, student staff, and alumni) across the four programs in the sample. While primary data source for this research was interviews, documentary evidence and observation were utilized as secondary data sources. The researcher employed the constant comparative method, an analytic induction grounded theory data analysis technique, to explore the data and construct a theory.
      The theory of high quality leadership programs developed in this study is grounded in those programmatic attributes that, when enacted, contribute significantly to enhancing student learning and leadership development. The data analysis revealed 16 attributes of high quality leadership programs organized into three clusters: a) participants engaged in building and sustaining a learning community; b) student-centered experiential learning experiences; and c) research grounded continuous program development. Through the program attributes, students learn about leadership and themselves in the course of engaging in the leadership process while reflecting on and applying their new learning and skills in collaborative action with others.
      The results of this multi-case grounded theory study of high quality leadership programs could be applied and adapted to enhance leadership development in colleges and universities. This theory will allow institutions to enhance their programs and participants’ leadership development by helping participants improve themselves through self-discovery, personal development, reflective practice and collaborative leadership action with others.

The 316 page pdf of the dissertation is available to buy through ProQuest for $42 or directly from this site for $29 through the below paypal button. You will receive the document by email.


Leadership Courses: Developing Foundational Undergraduate Leadership Courses

This monograph illustrates how to create a new leadership course or enhance an existing one through improved teaching, learning, and course content. Particular emphasis is given to foundational level courses that educate students about leadership and develop their personal leadership skills. Key sections include establishing a course for credit, text books, companion books, projects, activities, assessment, syllabi, and other print and online resources. This 74 page Leadership Courses publication authored by Darin Eich is a part of the “Leadership Insights & Applications” series available currently only through the National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs.  http://www.nclp.umd.edu/

Handbook for Student Leadership Programs

I’m trying to identify some publications that would be key resources for those leadership program practitioners in colleges and universities.  I was anticipating this book and read it during my day of traveling yesterday.  I found it to be an excellent resource and it would benefit many leadership educators and program coordinators.  There was a chapter on funding leadership programs which I found particularly timely and useful.  I learned something new about particular foundations and grants they award. The handbook was full of great examples and resources.  The “Handbook for Student Leadership Programs” is edited by Susan Komives, John Dugan, Julie Owen, Craig Slack and Wendy Wagner.  The stated description of this handbook is: “An excellent guide for establishing or enhancing campus leadership programs, the Handbook includes timely information, resources, and practical advice. Topics included: leadership models, leadership learning outcomes, structure and design of leadership programs (curricular, co-curricular and comprehensive), working with diverse populations, funding leadership programs, assessment and others.” This 222 page publication published in 2006 is available at http://www.nclp.umd.edu/